Grant Funders

Overview

Sources of Grant Funding

Explore the four sources of grant funding: Clubs & Organizations, Corporations, Foundations & Government.

Overview

Clubs & Organizations

Professional societies, trade associations, labor unions, cultural and religious organizations, and other groups of all types offer support to nonprofit organizations.   The first step in accessing these resources is knowing your community well. 
 

Overview

Corporate Funding

A number of corporations and local businesses donate some of their profits or resources to nonprofit organizations. The business may give grants directly, or through a separate, company-sponsored foundation.

Unlike foundations, corporations do not exist to give money away.  Their giving is often related to their business interests, to programs that benefit their employees or their families, or benefit the communities where the business is located. 

Image of How America’s Biggest Companies Give
Article

How America’s Biggest Companies Give
A useful graphic

This clever graphic offers information on giving at large companies in 2012.  Some areas require a subscription.

Image of Corporate Sponsorship Toolkit
Helpful link

Corporate Sponsorship Toolkit

The National Council of Nonprofits offers this useful toolkit review of things to consider when looking for a corporate sponsorship includes many useful links.

Image of Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy
Resource

Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy

The Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy is the only international forum of business CEOs and chairpersons focused exclusively on corporate philanthropy.  Their website offers insight into the motivation and practices of corporate giving programs through reports and other material.

Overview

Foundations

A foundation is a nonprofit organization whose primary purpose it to give money (grants) to organizations for scientific, educational, cultural, religious, or other charitable purposes.  It’s important to note that you can’t assume that an organization with the word foundation in its name is a grantmaker.  Foundation is not a legal term, and is used by a variety of organizations. There are two major categories of foundations: private and public.

Resource

Key Facts on U.S. Foundations
Report and infographics from the Foundation Center

According to Key Facts on U.S. Foundations, the Foundation Center’s new annual research study, in 2011 the country’s 81,777 foundations held $622 billion in assets and distributed $49 billion, an amount estimated to have reached $50.9 billion in 2012. The outlook for 2013 is for continued modest growth overall. 

You can download the full report and peruse some data packed infographics here.

Resource

Foundation Directory Online Free
Basic profiles of nearly 90,000 U.S. foundations

Foundation Directory Online Free, or FDO Free for short, includes basic profiles of nearly 90,000 U.S. foundations. Users can search by name, EIN, and location (state, county, city, metro area, congressional district, and ZIP code).

Overview

Government Funding

Government funding can come from city, county, state and federal agencies.

Grants.gov is your source to find and apply for federal grants.  Learn more about Grants.gov and determine if you are eligible for grant opportunities offered on this site.

The state of California’s website offers information on available state grants.

Post

Reforms for Federal Policies Relating to Grants

Henry Flood, The Grantsmanship Center’s Senior Advisor for Grant Administration has written two articles on this historic initiative “Reform of Federal Policies Relating to Grants and Cooperative Agreements Cost Principles and Administrative Requirements.”  Henry is a leading expert on federal grants policy and has published more than 50 articles on grants and grant administration.

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